Minimalism con Mama of Intention

Tuesday, September 4, 2018
Good mornin' ya'll y Buenos dias! I feel like I haven't posted on here in forever! But today I have an amazing interview with Mama of Intention on Minimalism. 

Minimalism sometimes seems like it is only for an elite group of super modern fancily dressed people, but that is so far from the truth. I am here to show ya'll this amazing mujer that is rocking minimalism through intentional living. Hope you love it!




  • How do you define minimalism?
  • My definition of minimalism is evolving. Minimalism for me is about intentional living. It’s not necessary about the amount of things we own, although I do live fairly minimally, but it’s how we are consuming and how that consumerism can continue to entrap us in cycles of systemic injustices. Minimalism is about radical imagination, and change. It’s our ability as people of color to live outside of white supremacy, which can take on a lot of different forms; living small, living with less, zero-waste, living off the grid, plant-based/vegan diets, all of this really fits into the minimalist lifestyle. Ultimately it’s about how we can live in such a way that is sustainable, that is in tune with our ancestors, that pushes back against respectability politics and that is freeing.  

  • What brought you to minimalism? 
  • I have been interested in living small and consuming less for the purposes of financial freedom for almost five years now. I started really on a whim, I hated looking at the clutter around my house, and I was tired of never having money to do the things I really wanted to do. Somewhere along the way, I watched the “Minimalist” documentary on Netflix and I was actually really angry. It was clear that minimalism had been co-opted and white-washed when for me minimalism was a form of freedom and liberation. I had never heard anyone else talk about minimalism in the way of freedom until I connected with Black Minimalist. They really brought me back in, but also pushed me to think about my values, and to be unapologetic in seeking freedom and liberation. Once I connected with them I felt more confident in owning the fact that I was a minimalist, especially since it began to reflect my values and way of life.

  • What challenges exist with living simply?  
  • Yes! My kids, my husband, my family. I am actually laughing while writing this. The reality is living simply has always been a desire before I could even name it. I knew I would live with less, and I knew I would be happy living with less. This was definitely not always my husband’s ideal way of living. There is a lot of emphasis on the “American Dream” in our culture. To own a house, cars, and to work hard is a show of “stability” and “freedom.” What is not emphasized is the debt, and fatigue that come with that lifestyle. My husband and I have had to have a lot of deep conversations about our intentions. We have had to evaluate and reevaluate our values and figure out if we are living in alignment with them. We have also had to share these values with our kids. The reality is we are fighting against million dollar corporations that target our children, so teaching our babies and equipping them to fight these systems is a radical way to create change.

  • What lessons have you learned from living simply? 
  • One lesson I have learned from living simply is that I deserve to be free. It’s true I will have to push back against consumeristic ideas, but I can. I can push back against respectability politics, I can live with less, I can live smaller. I can do this because I have the agency to.


  • How do we create space within our culture for minimalism? 
  • We create space in our culture for minimalism by being in community with one another. Real, intentional community that is willing to have tough conversations, is unafraid to ask questions and to push one another to explore and consider different ways we achieve freedom. The community part though I cannot emphasize enough. We need to be able to be in relationship with one another, intentional living is not easy. It is a lifetime process, where we are constantly learning new things, and evolving. We have to be able to reach out and to check-in.

  • Where can we connect with you? 


Tlazo to Amanda for taking the time out of her busy day to do this interview! Check out her blog for the interview she did of me!

Good mornin' ya'll y Buenos dias! I feel like I haven't posted on here in forever! But today I have an amazing interview with Mama of Intention on Minimalism. 

Minimalism sometimes seems like it is only for an elite group of super modern fancily dressed people, but that is so far from the truth. I am here to show ya'll this amazing mujer that is rocking minimalism through intentional living. Hope you love it!




  • How do you define minimalism?
  • My definition of minimalism is evolving. Minimalism for me is about intentional living. It’s not necessary about the amount of things we own, although I do live fairly minimally, but it’s how we are consuming and how that consumerism can continue to entrap us in cycles of systemic injustices. Minimalism is about radical imagination, and change. It’s our ability as people of color to live outside of white supremacy, which can take on a lot of different forms; living small, living with less, zero-waste, living off the grid, plant-based/vegan diets, all of this really fits into the minimalist lifestyle. Ultimately it’s about how we can live in such a way that is sustainable, that is in tune with our ancestors, that pushes back against respectability politics and that is freeing.  

  • What brought you to minimalism? 
  • I have been interested in living small and consuming less for the purposes of financial freedom for almost five years now. I started really on a whim, I hated looking at the clutter around my house, and I was tired of never having money to do the things I really wanted to do. Somewhere along the way, I watched the “Minimalist” documentary on Netflix and I was actually really angry. It was clear that minimalism had been co-opted and white-washed when for me minimalism was a form of freedom and liberation. I had never heard anyone else talk about minimalism in the way of freedom until I connected with Black Minimalist. They really brought me back in, but also pushed me to think about my values, and to be unapologetic in seeking freedom and liberation. Once I connected with them I felt more confident in owning the fact that I was a minimalist, especially since it began to reflect my values and way of life.

  • What challenges exist with living simply?  
  • Yes! My kids, my husband, my family. I am actually laughing while writing this. The reality is living simply has always been a desire before I could even name it. I knew I would live with less, and I knew I would be happy living with less. This was definitely not always my husband’s ideal way of living. There is a lot of emphasis on the “American Dream” in our culture. To own a house, cars, and to work hard is a show of “stability” and “freedom.” What is not emphasized is the debt, and fatigue that come with that lifestyle. My husband and I have had to have a lot of deep conversations about our intentions. We have had to evaluate and reevaluate our values and figure out if we are living in alignment with them. We have also had to share these values with our kids. The reality is we are fighting against million dollar corporations that target our children, so teaching our babies and equipping them to fight these systems is a radical way to create change.

  • What lessons have you learned from living simply? 
  • One lesson I have learned from living simply is that I deserve to be free. It’s true I will have to push back against consumeristic ideas, but I can. I can push back against respectability politics, I can live with less, I can live smaller. I can do this because I have the agency to.


  • How do we create space within our culture for minimalism? 
  • We create space in our culture for minimalism by being in community with one another. Real, intentional community that is willing to have tough conversations, is unafraid to ask questions and to push one another to explore and consider different ways we achieve freedom. The community part though I cannot emphasize enough. We need to be able to be in relationship with one another, intentional living is not easy. It is a lifetime process, where we are constantly learning new things, and evolving. We have to be able to reach out and to check-in.

  • Where can we connect with you? 


Tlazo to Amanda for taking the time out of her busy day to do this interview! Check out her blog for the interview she did of me!


AFJA || Academia de Futbol Juvenil Amatense

Tuesday, May 22, 2018
Hey ya'll! So I wanted to share an incredible non profit with ya'll. They are AFJA Academia de Futbol Juvenil Amatense. They are an amazing program that is changing so many lives. Here is the interview I did with Steven, the creator of the program. 



Could you tell us a little bit about AFJA?

AFJA, stands for Academia de Futbol Juvenil Amatense. It is a non profit youth soccer academy located in Canton Los Amates in departamento La Libertad in El Salvador. The focus of this academy is to provide access  to a free and all inclusive academy for at risk girls and boys ages 5-19 in the community and surrounding areas. To understand the need for this work, one really has to see the environment and conditions that these children find themselves in. Our hope is that by providing these children with access to recreational soccer we keep them out of potential recruitment into gangs, drugs, and human trafficking that is so prevalent in the area. The program is 100% free, however there are strict requirements for eligibility (see below). We connect with youth soccer clubs to set up donation drives. We teach American youth soccer players the importance of sustainability and empower them to donate their gear to children in need. By recycling the gear we are reusing the gear that would otherwise end up in the trash. 

Eligibility requirements:
1) Academic: participants must provide monthly academic progress reports from teachers. We identify areas of need and pay for tutor sessions. 
2) Social project: Each month the students vote on a social project. We empower them to come up with their own ideas for community service projects each month and provide them resources and help to execute their idea. For example, we last month we had a clean up day and filled 10 large trash bags full of litter and disposed of it at a proper bin. The kids learn about the importance of maintaining their space clean. Traditionally, the trash is burned emitting toxic fumes into the air, so we also use this opportunity to teach. This is just one example of the many ideas that come from their own bright minds. 
3) Attendance: Their is a strict attendance policy to instill responsibility. 




What made you want to start this program?

This program was inspired by my personal experiences, my mother was born and raised in this community. Every summer, instead of summer camp, I was sent to Los Amates and grew up witnessing the vast disparities between life in LA (Los Angeles) and LA (Los Amates). When I graduated from the University of Southern California in 2015, I wanted to start a new venture. In the summer of 2017, through Crowd Funding, AFJA was born. 



What is it that you love most about creating this program?

What I love most about this project is the amount of support it has received. Personally, I feel that we are living a Central American Renaissance of sorts where we are reclaiming our identities. If you ask any non Salvadoran person what they know about El Salvador, they will more often than not mention two things....MS-13 and Pupusas. The rhetoric coming out from Trump has emboldened negative stereotypes of our people. This project is showing the world that on the other side of their fence are real children with real potential for good. I love sharing each child's story with the world. 



How do you think the children benefit from AFJA?

The Children benefit by not only receiving cleats, uniforms and other tangible goods, but also from the dedication from the adults in the community who volunteer as coaches. We are providing them the opportunity to laugh. We are not just providing them access to soccer equipment, we are helping them simply be kids and have access to joy. 



What are some plans for the future?

We return in July, in which we will have a world cup themed tournaments, an excursion, and watch parties for the soccer games. We also through cinema nights showing movies like CoCo on a big outdoor screen. A lot of our kids have never been to the movies, so we bring the cinema experience to them. 



Please show them some love and support by following their journey on Instagram @AFJA.ES 

Tlazo


Hey ya'll! So I wanted to share an incredible non profit with ya'll. They are AFJA Academia de Futbol Juvenil Amatense. They are an amazing program that is changing so many lives. Here is the interview I did with Steven, the creator of the program. 



Could you tell us a little bit about AFJA?

AFJA, stands for Academia de Futbol Juvenil Amatense. It is a non profit youth soccer academy located in Canton Los Amates in departamento La Libertad in El Salvador. The focus of this academy is to provide access  to a free and all inclusive academy for at risk girls and boys ages 5-19 in the community and surrounding areas. To understand the need for this work, one really has to see the environment and conditions that these children find themselves in. Our hope is that by providing these children with access to recreational soccer we keep them out of potential recruitment into gangs, drugs, and human trafficking that is so prevalent in the area. The program is 100% free, however there are strict requirements for eligibility (see below). We connect with youth soccer clubs to set up donation drives. We teach American youth soccer players the importance of sustainability and empower them to donate their gear to children in need. By recycling the gear we are reusing the gear that would otherwise end up in the trash. 

Eligibility requirements:
1) Academic: participants must provide monthly academic progress reports from teachers. We identify areas of need and pay for tutor sessions. 
2) Social project: Each month the students vote on a social project. We empower them to come up with their own ideas for community service projects each month and provide them resources and help to execute their idea. For example, we last month we had a clean up day and filled 10 large trash bags full of litter and disposed of it at a proper bin. The kids learn about the importance of maintaining their space clean. Traditionally, the trash is burned emitting toxic fumes into the air, so we also use this opportunity to teach. This is just one example of the many ideas that come from their own bright minds. 
3) Attendance: Their is a strict attendance policy to instill responsibility. 




What made you want to start this program?

This program was inspired by my personal experiences, my mother was born and raised in this community. Every summer, instead of summer camp, I was sent to Los Amates and grew up witnessing the vast disparities between life in LA (Los Angeles) and LA (Los Amates). When I graduated from the University of Southern California in 2015, I wanted to start a new venture. In the summer of 2017, through Crowd Funding, AFJA was born. 



What is it that you love most about creating this program?

What I love most about this project is the amount of support it has received. Personally, I feel that we are living a Central American Renaissance of sorts where we are reclaiming our identities. If you ask any non Salvadoran person what they know about El Salvador, they will more often than not mention two things....MS-13 and Pupusas. The rhetoric coming out from Trump has emboldened negative stereotypes of our people. This project is showing the world that on the other side of their fence are real children with real potential for good. I love sharing each child's story with the world. 



How do you think the children benefit from AFJA?

The Children benefit by not only receiving cleats, uniforms and other tangible goods, but also from the dedication from the adults in the community who volunteer as coaches. We are providing them the opportunity to laugh. We are not just providing them access to soccer equipment, we are helping them simply be kids and have access to joy. 



What are some plans for the future?

We return in July, in which we will have a world cup themed tournaments, an excursion, and watch parties for the soccer games. We also through cinema nights showing movies like CoCo on a big outdoor screen. A lot of our kids have never been to the movies, so we bring the cinema experience to them. 



Please show them some love and support by following their journey on Instagram @AFJA.ES 

Tlazo



NO to the destruction and contamination of the archaeological site of TACUSCALCO-NAHUILINGO

Tuesday, April 17, 2018
Please sign this petition to prevent the destruction of this archeological site! LINK HERE


All info found here

The archaeological zone and ceremonial civic center of TACUSCALCO (Nahulingo, El Salvador), declared a cultural asset by the Special Law for the Protection of the Cultural Heritage of El Salvador (LEPPCES) is being destroyed by the construction of 726 houses and a commercial center for the project of Urbanización Las Victorias, by the company INVERSIONES E INMOBILIARIA FÉNIX SA de CV
The researcher and archaeologist Federico Paredes confirmed the existence of pyramidal mounds and ceramic vestiges of the post-classical and pre-classical periods, which confirms that this area is an ancient territory and of very old settlements and that they have been destroyed by the dirt works of the construction company.
TACUSCALCO has a non-quantifiable value. The Lienzo de Tlaxcala document, belonging to the early colonial period, tells us that in 1524 the battle of TACUSCALCO was fought there, a fact narrated in one of the letters of the Spanish conquistador Pedro de Alvarado.
There is no doubt, then, that this is a space of great importance for the research processes that strengthen our identity and historical memory.
On the other hand, the construction project of INVERSIONES E INMOBILIARIA FÉNIX SA de CV also threatens the natural heritage and the quality of life of the inhabitants by increasing the flow of toxic substances in the flow of the Ceniza River in the locality.
The destruction caused by the real estate company violates the rights of indigenous peoples, the right to water and sanitation and the right to cultural heritage.
We show our condemnation and repudiate the fact that the company continues to work in impunity despite the restrictions and complaints pointed out by different sectors.
 Faced with this situation, the signers DEMAND: 
  1.  To the President of the Republic, Salvador Sánchez Cerén,
  2.  To the Attorney General of the Republic, Douglas Meléndez,
  3. To the Minister of the Environment, Lina Pohl,
  4.  To the Environmental Court of Santa Ana,
  5. To the Secretary of Culture of the Presidency, Silvia E. Regalado,
  6. To the deputies of the Legislative Assembly;
  7. To the Permanent Delegation of UNESCO in El Salvador 
 That they carry out the corresponding procedures from their institutions so that, according to the law, the destruction of our archaeological and environmental patrimony is stopped. So also that the corresponding investigations are carried out and responsibilities of the juridical or natural persons involved in the events are determined.
 From this platform of artists, cultural and academic managers, social organizations, environmentalists and civilians we will be vigilant in the resolution of our demands, and we will be available to join other initiatives and actions that safeguard the conservation and protection of our cultural heritage and natural

Read our full statement on the  site:

SAY NO TO THE DESTRUCTION AND CONTAMINATION OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE OF TACUSCALCO-NAHUILINGO
The archaeological cultural heritage of the area is in terrible threat of being extinguished.
The archaeological zone and ceremonial civic center of TACUSCALCO (Nahulingo, El Salvador), declared a cultural asset by the Special Law for the Protection of the Cultural Heritage of El Salvador (LEPPCES) is being destroyed for the construction of 726 houses and a shopping mall by the project of Urbanización Las Victorias, of which the company INVERSIONES E INMOBILIARIA FÉNIX SA de CV is in charge.
The researcher and archaeologist Federico Paredes confirmed the existence of pyramidal mounds and ceramic vestiges of the post-classical and pre-classical periods, which confirms that this area is an ancestral territory of an ancient settlement that had been destroyed by the construction company.
TACUSCALCO has an incalculable value. The Lienzo de Tlaxcala document, belonging to the early colonial period, tells us that in 1524 the battle of TACUSCALCO took place there, a fact narrated in one of the letters of the Spanish conquistador Pedro de Alvarado.
There is no doubt, then, that this is a space of great importance for the research processes that strengthen our identity and historical memory.
On the other hand, the construction project of INVERSIONES E INMOBILIARIA FÉNIX SA of CV also threatens the natural heritage and the quality of life of its inhabitants by increasing the flow of toxic substances in the local river, Ceniza River.
The destruction caused by the real estate company threatens the rights of indigenous peoples, the right to water and sanitation, and the right to cultural heritage.
We show our condemnation and repudiate the fact that the company continues to work in impunity despite the restrictions and complaints pointed out by different sectors.
Faced with this situation, the undersigned DEMAND:
1. To the President of the Republic, Salvador Sánchez Cerén,
2. To the Attorney General of the Republic, Douglas Meléndez,
3. To the Minister of the Environment, Lina Pohl,
4. To the Environmental Court of Santa Ana,
5. To the Secretary of Culture of the Presidency, Silvia E. Regalado,
6. To the deputies of the Legislative Assembly;
7. To the Permanent Delegation of UNESCO in El Salvador

That they carry out the corresponding procedures from their institutions so that, in accordance with the law, the destruction of our archaeological and environmental patrimony is stopped. And that the corresponding investigations and responsibilities of the legal or natural persons involved in the events are determined.

From this platform of artists, cultural and academic managers, social organizations, environmentalists and civilians, we are vigilant in their solution of our demands, and we are available to join other initiatives and actions that safeguard the conservation and protection of our natural cultural heritage.

Read the full document on this site:
For more information:
Please sign this petition to prevent the destruction of this archeological site! LINK HERE


All info found here

The archaeological zone and ceremonial civic center of TACUSCALCO (Nahulingo, El Salvador), declared a cultural asset by the Special Law for the Protection of the Cultural Heritage of El Salvador (LEPPCES) is being destroyed by the construction of 726 houses and a commercial center for the project of Urbanización Las Victorias, by the company INVERSIONES E INMOBILIARIA FÉNIX SA de CV
The researcher and archaeologist Federico Paredes confirmed the existence of pyramidal mounds and ceramic vestiges of the post-classical and pre-classical periods, which confirms that this area is an ancient territory and of very old settlements and that they have been destroyed by the dirt works of the construction company.
TACUSCALCO has a non-quantifiable value. The Lienzo de Tlaxcala document, belonging to the early colonial period, tells us that in 1524 the battle of TACUSCALCO was fought there, a fact narrated in one of the letters of the Spanish conquistador Pedro de Alvarado.
There is no doubt, then, that this is a space of great importance for the research processes that strengthen our identity and historical memory.
On the other hand, the construction project of INVERSIONES E INMOBILIARIA FÉNIX SA de CV also threatens the natural heritage and the quality of life of the inhabitants by increasing the flow of toxic substances in the flow of the Ceniza River in the locality.
The destruction caused by the real estate company violates the rights of indigenous peoples, the right to water and sanitation and the right to cultural heritage.
We show our condemnation and repudiate the fact that the company continues to work in impunity despite the restrictions and complaints pointed out by different sectors.
 Faced with this situation, the signers DEMAND: 
  1.  To the President of the Republic, Salvador Sánchez Cerén,
  2.  To the Attorney General of the Republic, Douglas Meléndez,
  3. To the Minister of the Environment, Lina Pohl,
  4.  To the Environmental Court of Santa Ana,
  5. To the Secretary of Culture of the Presidency, Silvia E. Regalado,
  6. To the deputies of the Legislative Assembly;
  7. To the Permanent Delegation of UNESCO in El Salvador 
 That they carry out the corresponding procedures from their institutions so that, according to the law, the destruction of our archaeological and environmental patrimony is stopped. So also that the corresponding investigations are carried out and responsibilities of the juridical or natural persons involved in the events are determined.
 From this platform of artists, cultural and academic managers, social organizations, environmentalists and civilians we will be vigilant in the resolution of our demands, and we will be available to join other initiatives and actions that safeguard the conservation and protection of our cultural heritage and natural

Read our full statement on the  site:

SAY NO TO THE DESTRUCTION AND CONTAMINATION OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE OF TACUSCALCO-NAHUILINGO
The archaeological cultural heritage of the area is in terrible threat of being extinguished.
The archaeological zone and ceremonial civic center of TACUSCALCO (Nahulingo, El Salvador), declared a cultural asset by the Special Law for the Protection of the Cultural Heritage of El Salvador (LEPPCES) is being destroyed for the construction of 726 houses and a shopping mall by the project of Urbanización Las Victorias, of which the company INVERSIONES E INMOBILIARIA FÉNIX SA de CV is in charge.
The researcher and archaeologist Federico Paredes confirmed the existence of pyramidal mounds and ceramic vestiges of the post-classical and pre-classical periods, which confirms that this area is an ancestral territory of an ancient settlement that had been destroyed by the construction company.
TACUSCALCO has an incalculable value. The Lienzo de Tlaxcala document, belonging to the early colonial period, tells us that in 1524 the battle of TACUSCALCO took place there, a fact narrated in one of the letters of the Spanish conquistador Pedro de Alvarado.
There is no doubt, then, that this is a space of great importance for the research processes that strengthen our identity and historical memory.
On the other hand, the construction project of INVERSIONES E INMOBILIARIA FÉNIX SA of CV also threatens the natural heritage and the quality of life of its inhabitants by increasing the flow of toxic substances in the local river, Ceniza River.
The destruction caused by the real estate company threatens the rights of indigenous peoples, the right to water and sanitation, and the right to cultural heritage.
We show our condemnation and repudiate the fact that the company continues to work in impunity despite the restrictions and complaints pointed out by different sectors.
Faced with this situation, the undersigned DEMAND:
1. To the President of the Republic, Salvador Sánchez Cerén,
2. To the Attorney General of the Republic, Douglas Meléndez,
3. To the Minister of the Environment, Lina Pohl,
4. To the Environmental Court of Santa Ana,
5. To the Secretary of Culture of the Presidency, Silvia E. Regalado,
6. To the deputies of the Legislative Assembly;
7. To the Permanent Delegation of UNESCO in El Salvador

That they carry out the corresponding procedures from their institutions so that, in accordance with the law, the destruction of our archaeological and environmental patrimony is stopped. And that the corresponding investigations and responsibilities of the legal or natural persons involved in the events are determined.

From this platform of artists, cultural and academic managers, social organizations, environmentalists and civilians, we are vigilant in their solution of our demands, and we are available to join other initiatives and actions that safeguard the conservation and protection of our natural cultural heritage.

Read the full document on this site:
For more information:

Finds & Favorites || March

Tuesday, April 10, 2018



How Not To Die: https://amzn.to/2GPKnoY
How Not To Die The Cookbook: https://amzn.to/2IGtWMi
Brujita Skincare: https://brujitaskincare.com/

Seven Seconds 
The Bread Winner
Take Your Pills
Freeway: Crack The System 
Flint 

Money and the Law of Attraction: https://amzn.to/2qn8tAC



Tlazo



How Not To Die: https://amzn.to/2GPKnoY
How Not To Die The Cookbook: https://amzn.to/2IGtWMi
Brujita Skincare: https://brujitaskincare.com/

Seven Seconds 
The Bread Winner
Take Your Pills
Freeway: Crack The System 
Flint 

Money and the Law of Attraction: https://amzn.to/2qn8tAC



Tlazo

Cusco, Peru

Monday, April 9, 2018
The following are photos from the frontlines of Espinar in Cusco, Peru. The mining company Glencore Antapaccay with the support of the Peruvian National Police are brutally attacking innocent native women who are defending their rights and ancestral land. These injustices cannot be left to be. We must fight to change this! It is outrageous that these women are being harassed for protecting what is THEIRS. Let us show them support! Let’s put pressure on these companies to leave our native people alone! Spahichy is assisting by connecting allies with the folks out there and spreading the word. You can donate at their site www.Saphichay.org Let’s get this info out there! 




More info found at:
  •  https://ejatlas.org/conflict/tintaya-espinar-peru
  • https://theecologist.org/2014/dec/27/glencore-xstrata-and-corporate-power-peru 
  • http://www.saphichay.org/es/ 



The following are photos from the frontlines of Espinar in Cusco, Peru. The mining company Glencore Antapaccay with the support of the Peruvian National Police are brutally attacking innocent native women who are defending their rights and ancestral land. These injustices cannot be left to be. We must fight to change this! It is outrageous that these women are being harassed for protecting what is THEIRS. Let us show them support! Let’s put pressure on these companies to leave our native people alone! Spahichy is assisting by connecting allies with the folks out there and spreading the word. You can donate at their site www.Saphichay.org Let’s get this info out there! 




More info found at:
  •  https://ejatlas.org/conflict/tintaya-espinar-peru
  • https://theecologist.org/2014/dec/27/glencore-xstrata-and-corporate-power-peru 
  • http://www.saphichay.org/es/ 




Finds and Favorites || February

Sunday, March 18, 2018


Hey ya'll! I have gathered some of my most favorite things from the month to show you guys.  What are some of your favorite things this month? 




Meow Meow Tweet Facial Soap

Ecodent Vegan Floss

500 Years of Chicana Women's History

Reusable sandwich bag

Rotten on Netflix

War and Power on Netflix

Black Mirror or Netflix

The Moneyless Man

The Mind Gut Connection

How Children Learn


Tlazo


Hey ya'll! I have gathered some of my most favorite things from the month to show you guys.  What are some of your favorite things this month? 




Meow Meow Tweet Facial Soap

Ecodent Vegan Floss

500 Years of Chicana Women's History

Reusable sandwich bag

Rotten on Netflix

War and Power on Netflix

Black Mirror or Netflix

The Moneyless Man

The Mind Gut Connection

How Children Learn


Tlazo

Brown Wear Apperal

Saturday, February 3, 2018
I have come across BrownWearApperal, a shop with a message. It's an Etsy shop that promotes being proud of our indigenous roots. If you guys have been following me on Instagram for a while, you would have noticed the drastic change in my passion for my culture, our true culture. When I was looking to buy a shirt from the shop I really couldn't decide which one I wanted to get! They are all so awesome! This is the one I went for.
I am so excited to be able to share with you guys a bit from BrownWearApperal                                       



Here is some information from the shop owner Justin Rodrigez: I started Brown Wear Apparel because I wanted to raise the consciousness of Brown people here on the American continent; who we are, where we come from, and who are our ancestors were. Many of our people don’t realize that we are Native American by blood; different tribes but one people. I myself didn't have this knowledge of who I was., I knew we were Mexican, but then I heard we were also Hispanic, and later we were Latino; it was all really confusing. For years I just accepted that's the way it was, until my brother, who was my roommate at the time, started searching for answers and then began to develop an understanding who we truly are. Being his roommate, I couldn’t help but overhear what he was listening to; or see what he was watching. Different books would arrive in the mail and I would ask him what they were about; they sounded very interesting. My brother had started to change some; his philosophy on life seemed different. I noticed a sense of pride in who he was as a Brown man, being Mexican, and identifying with his Indigenous ancestry. This was very refreshing to me because it seemed to me that we were supposed to try and assimilate to white culture, but I never really saw pride in doing that. He never once tried preaching or forcing information on me; occasionally he would say, “Hey, did you know about this?” or “Have you ever heard about that?" Over time, I started asking him more questions, until eventually, I was seeking knowledge for myself; and that’s when my consciousness really started to develop. I started reading more, watching documentaries, I began to travel more and seek what my ancestors left behind. Then I continued on my own path to do as my brother did for me, he reached his hand out for me to be free, and so I made it my life’s mission to reach my hand out for all my Brown brothers and sisters who were in my shoes. This is why I chose "“Awake, Embrace, Empower” as Brown Wear’s mantra. Because first comes the awaking; the individual gains a knowledge of self. Next comes embracing who you are, the culture; and the people you come from. The last part is perhaps the most important part; and its empowerment. Not only are you empowered by gaining knowledge of self, but as you are mentally liberated, your presence automatically liberates others.

Photos from Panama

Photos from Panama

Photos from Panama


Here is a little bit more from the shop:

My background is in art, and I kind of stopped drawing and painting for years but then in 2014, I started making shirts because there wasn't anything that really represented who we are as Brown people. I started looking into screen printing; my brother and I were working with very basic equipment and set up. We had two screens, one squeegee, and no screen press; just eyeballing it. My first shirt was "Unapologetically Indigenous No assimilation required" The second shirt was "Not Hispanic I'm Pre Hispanic" as I slowly regained my artistic skills back again I started doing more and more designs. Later on, my brother stopped being involved with the making of the shirts; but has always still been a big supporter. As I kept making shirts I started doing more traveling with an interest to meet Indigenous people in Central, and South America. On a couple of trips, I made shirts to pass out that had a message of Indigenous pride and unity. While in Panama I passed out 30 shirts to the Kuna people, and I made around the same amount to pass out on my trip to Nicaragua. This past year I was fortunate to visit Puerto Rico (before the hurricane), Peru, and back to the Yucatan. This year I’ll be visiting some brothers and sisters in Nevada and Cali, and get some photos with fans wearing the shirts. Everyone I’ve reached out to has been more than happy to participate. I hope my shirts will help our people fall back in love with themselves and get rid of self-hate within our communities. 


Photos from Nicaragua 

Photos from Nicaragua

Photos from Nicaragua
To show your support head over to BrownWearApperal here.



Tlazocamahti

I have come across BrownWearApperal, a shop with a message. It's an Etsy shop that promotes being proud of our indigenous roots. If you guys have been following me on Instagram for a while, you would have noticed the drastic change in my passion for my culture, our true culture. When I was looking to buy a shirt from the shop I really couldn't decide which one I wanted to get! They are all so awesome! This is the one I went for.
I am so excited to be able to share with you guys a bit from BrownWearApperal                                       



Here is some information from the shop owner Justin Rodrigez: I started Brown Wear Apparel because I wanted to raise the consciousness of Brown people here on the American continent; who we are, where we come from, and who are our ancestors were. Many of our people don’t realize that we are Native American by blood; different tribes but one people. I myself didn't have this knowledge of who I was., I knew we were Mexican, but then I heard we were also Hispanic, and later we were Latino; it was all really confusing. For years I just accepted that's the way it was, until my brother, who was my roommate at the time, started searching for answers and then began to develop an understanding who we truly are. Being his roommate, I couldn’t help but overhear what he was listening to; or see what he was watching. Different books would arrive in the mail and I would ask him what they were about; they sounded very interesting. My brother had started to change some; his philosophy on life seemed different. I noticed a sense of pride in who he was as a Brown man, being Mexican, and identifying with his Indigenous ancestry. This was very refreshing to me because it seemed to me that we were supposed to try and assimilate to white culture, but I never really saw pride in doing that. He never once tried preaching or forcing information on me; occasionally he would say, “Hey, did you know about this?” or “Have you ever heard about that?" Over time, I started asking him more questions, until eventually, I was seeking knowledge for myself; and that’s when my consciousness really started to develop. I started reading more, watching documentaries, I began to travel more and seek what my ancestors left behind. Then I continued on my own path to do as my brother did for me, he reached his hand out for me to be free, and so I made it my life’s mission to reach my hand out for all my Brown brothers and sisters who were in my shoes. This is why I chose "“Awake, Embrace, Empower” as Brown Wear’s mantra. Because first comes the awaking; the individual gains a knowledge of self. Next comes embracing who you are, the culture; and the people you come from. The last part is perhaps the most important part; and its empowerment. Not only are you empowered by gaining knowledge of self, but as you are mentally liberated, your presence automatically liberates others.

Photos from Panama

Photos from Panama

Photos from Panama


Here is a little bit more from the shop:

My background is in art, and I kind of stopped drawing and painting for years but then in 2014, I started making shirts because there wasn't anything that really represented who we are as Brown people. I started looking into screen printing; my brother and I were working with very basic equipment and set up. We had two screens, one squeegee, and no screen press; just eyeballing it. My first shirt was "Unapologetically Indigenous No assimilation required" The second shirt was "Not Hispanic I'm Pre Hispanic" as I slowly regained my artistic skills back again I started doing more and more designs. Later on, my brother stopped being involved with the making of the shirts; but has always still been a big supporter. As I kept making shirts I started doing more traveling with an interest to meet Indigenous people in Central, and South America. On a couple of trips, I made shirts to pass out that had a message of Indigenous pride and unity. While in Panama I passed out 30 shirts to the Kuna people, and I made around the same amount to pass out on my trip to Nicaragua. This past year I was fortunate to visit Puerto Rico (before the hurricane), Peru, and back to the Yucatan. This year I’ll be visiting some brothers and sisters in Nevada and Cali, and get some photos with fans wearing the shirts. Everyone I’ve reached out to has been more than happy to participate. I hope my shirts will help our people fall back in love with themselves and get rid of self-hate within our communities. 


Photos from Nicaragua 

Photos from Nicaragua

Photos from Nicaragua
To show your support head over to BrownWearApperal here.



Tlazocamahti


Day In The Life With A One Year Old || Vegan, Breastfeeding, Cloth Diapering

Friday, January 12, 2018


Hey ya’ll! I finally have my Day In The Life With A One Year Old video for you guys. Just a few things to start off: parenthood looks different for every person. This is just to show you guys what a typical day looks like for me. I am a work from home mom who breastfeeds and uses cloth diapers so the life with a one-year-old for a single dad may look completely different. We should not compare ourselves but we can totally learn from one another’s experiences. I hope you guys enjoy. The products that I use: Diaper Cream Code for diaper cream: VEGANMAMA Discount: 20% off orders $20+ Plaine Products
Tlazocamahti





Hey ya’ll! I finally have my Day In The Life With A One Year Old video for you guys. Just a few things to start off: parenthood looks different for every person. This is just to show you guys what a typical day looks like for me. I am a work from home mom who breastfeeds and uses cloth diapers so the life with a one-year-old for a single dad may look completely different. We should not compare ourselves but we can totally learn from one another’s experiences. I hope you guys enjoy. The products that I use: Diaper Cream Code for diaper cream: VEGANMAMA Discount: 20% off orders $20+ Plaine Products
Tlazocamahti




@jenriverabell